Reasons For Drivers License Suspension in New Jersey

Monday, September 30th, 2013

Getting your license suspended can be an unfortunate life changing event.  From the time you got your license as a teenager, you have enjoyed the freedom and mobility that a driver’s license has given you.

New Jersey has many reasons why they may suspend your license, but we will go over the 4 most popular offenses.

Points -  In the state of New Jersey, for every moving violation a driver commits, they will receive points on their license.  When the driver accumulates 12 or more points, their license will become suspended.

No Insurance – The state of New Jersey will suspend your license if you are caught driving without car insurance.  New Jersey requires all motor vehicles to obtain insurance.  You must also carry your proof of insurance with you at all times.  Depending on the situation, you can also have your license suspended if you can’t provide proof of insurance at the time it is required.

Driving Under the Influence –  If you are caught driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol, the state of New Jersey will suspend your license.  The suspension time will vary depending on the severity of the situation and will also vary depending on whether this is a first time or repeat offense.

Driving With Suspended License -  If you are caught driving with an already suspended license, then the state of New Jersey will increase the length of time of the suspension.  Depending on the severity of the situation, the state of New Jersey can also charge imprisonment for up to 5 years.  You can also have your license suspended if you are caught driving without your license.

Obtaining the best attorney in NJ is the smartest move you can make when you commit a crime that will lead to suspension of your license.  Whether the suspension is due to no insurance or a DWI in NJ, Charles Block has the experience needed to get you the best results possible.

 

The Effects Of Drinking And Driving

Friday, July 6th, 2012

Drunk driving is a major problem that law enforcement is striving to prevent and control. An alcohol-related car accident and drunk-driving conviction can have many negative consequences in your life, including jail or prison time, a criminal record, car repair or replacement, restitution, guilt and grief over harm to others, higher insurance premiums, a civil lawsuit, fines, court and administrative fees, community service, alcohol education, substance-abuse treatment, social stigma, and restrictions on or revocation of your driver’s license.

The causes and effects of drinking and driving are staggering. Poor coordination, disorientation, blackouts, slurred speech, poor self-esteem and double vision are just the short-term effects of alcohol abuse. The long-term effects of alcohol consumption can include heart disease, peptic ulcers and cirrhosis a debilitating liver disease called.

Studies have shown it only takes three to four, 12-ounce beers for a 170 pound male to become intoxicated, and one to three of those same beers for an average sized woman to become intoxicated.

After the nightmare of a drunk-driving trial, conviction and sentence, your driving privileges may still be intact or may be restored. However, the question of  automobile insurance becomes more complex and expensive. Exactly what your insurance company legally can do varies from state to state and depends on the insurance law of your state.

Your insurance company may cancel or decline to renew your policy, restrict coverage provisions or increase your premiums based on your drunk driving record. Overall your premiums could go up as much as 100 percent or more.

How your insurer reacts to your drunk driving may be worse if you have other strikes against you, including previous drunk-driving convictions, traffic tickets, at-fault accidents, late or unpaid insurance premiums or other negative history with the insurer. Other significant issues your record may impact is coverage by other types of insurance policies, such as life or medical insurance.

 

Reckless Driving

Sunday, April 15th, 2012

Reckless driving is defined as a moving violation in which a driver displays a disregard for the rules of the road. In essence, reckless drivers put themselves and others at risk, and they often involve more than one traffic violation. Reckless driving offenders are punished by fines, jail time, and/or driver’s license suspension or revocation.

Disregard for the safety of people or property is a common element in reckless driving car accidents. Reckless driving acts include, but are not limited to, the following situations:

.Causing an automobile accident

.Running red lights

.Distracted driving

.Running stop signs

.Drinking and driving

.Speeding

.Driving under the influence of drugs

.Suddenly braking

.Driving without headlights

.Tailgating

High Rate of Speeding

While speeding alone isn’t usually considered reckless driving, an extremely high rate of speed might lead an officer to charge someone with reckless driving.

Alcohol and Drugs Also Lead to Reckless Driving

Everyone that gets behind the wheel knowing that they are drunk or impaired are by definition reckless drivers. According to the courts, reckless driving and DUI offenses are separate crimes, and drivers may sometimes be charged with both crimes.

Most car accidents can be prevented by following these simple tips:

.Always wear a seatbelt

.Avoid distractions caused by passengers, cell phones, food, or loud music

.Don’t speed

.Obey all traffic signs

.And try not to drive when tired.

Not every automobile accident can be prevented, but you can control whether or not you cause a serious car crash.

The penalties for Reckless Driving in New Jersey are as follows:

.Jail of up to 2 Months (3 months for a 2nd offense)

.Fines of 50-$200. (Up to $500 for a Second Offense)

.5 Points on your Driving Record

The penalties for Careless Driving are:

.Fines

.2 Points on your Driving Record

Driving Without Insurance

Friday, December 16th, 2011

Driving without insurance varies from state to state—and so do the penalties imposed. You may have your car registration suspended as well as your driver’s license. Whether or not you did not get around to paying your insurance (or are looking for cheaper rates) and your insurance lapses, operating your car without insurance is a hazard.

If you get in an accident and you have no insurance, your assets may be at risk since you will be held responsible for the damages caused. Also, if you get caught driving without a registration the penalties are usually tougher because you could have caused an accident in which you were
not covered.

Driving in New Jersey without auto insurance or not being able to show proof of auto insurance when requested is a serious offense carrying severe penalties. According to the NJ Motor Vehicle Commission a citation for driving uninsured puts you at risk of economic loss, fines,
suspension of driver’s license or registration, community service, surcharges, and time in jail.

The New Jersey statutes state that every owner or registered owner of a motor vehicle registered or principally garaged in the state of New Jersey shall maintain motor vehicle coverage, under provisions approved by the Commissioner of Insurance.

A first time violation of driving without liability insurance includes a fine of at least $300 and up to $1000, community service, DMV surcharges of $250 for 3 years, and the loss of your license for up to one year. In addition to court costs and fees.

A second time offense comes with a fine up to $5000, a mandatory jail sentence of 14 days, 30 days community service and a license suspension for 2 years or more. State laws and statutes are always being changed and updated, so it is important to contact the courts to find out what the exact penalties are for driving uninsured.

Remember that you are breaking the law if you drive without the proper auto insurance.