Juvenile Use of Weapons

Saturday, March 10th, 2012

Our schools, a place of safety, learning, and growth, are being challenged daily by violent acts, including:  homicide, assaults, child sexual abuse, and violence affecting teachers, parents, children, and the whole community.  Victims of violent crimes may suffer physical, social, and emotional withdrawal from peer and family relations and become more likely to abuse alcohol or drugs. These traumatic experiences further contribute to their lack of effective learning, growth, and development. Today, the major problems in our schools are the use of firearms, weapons, substance abuse, and gangs. Such acts of violence occur not only in large urban areas, but also suburban and rural schools including both public and private schools. In 2004, students ages 12 to 18 were victims of 107,400 serious violent crimes at school (U.S. Department of Justice, 2006.) In 2005, 8% of students reported being threatened or injured with a weapon such as a gun, knife, or club on school property, and only 55% of high-school students felt safe at school.

The use of guns in schools has increased to the point that approximately one in four major school districts now uses metal detectors to reduce the number of weapons brought into schools by students. Juvenile offenders arrested for weapons violations are sometimes fellow students, and non-student peers who threaten and attack students, administrators, and teachers. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 1995 nearly one-fourth of students nationwide had carried a gun to school. In 1997, 4,205 children and teens died as a result of gunfire – one every two hours, nearly 12 every day. Gun violence among juveniles further causes countless injuries and disabilities.

The Crime Control Act of 1990 was passed by Congress in an effort to regain control of schools in the United States. The Act prohibits possession or discharge of a firearm on or within 1,000 feet of private, parochial, or public school grounds. Violators can face up to five years imprisonment, a fine of no more than $250,000, or both. As of 1996, fifteen states including New Jersey have passed laws making adults criminally liable for shootings committed by children who have access to the weapons. A maximum of three years in prison can result for a fatal shooting that occurs in this type of situation.

Any juvenile charged with unlawful possession of a firearm in New Jersey is subject to a Fourth Degree crime.  Furthermore, a juvenile charged with delinquency for weapon possession must face a retention hearing where the court may decide to hold the juvenile in detention pending the outcome of the case. If the juvenile was also in Possession of a Firearm for Unlawful Purposes, he faces an enhanced charge involving a Second Degree crime. If the firearm was brought into a school, then the charge is a Third Degree offense. A juvenile being charged with a Third Degree, and even Second Degree crime, can face a lengthy incarceration time or additional consequences if convicted.

Caught in sobriety check Point: Still Hope for defense

Friday, October 29th, 2010

Every year, there are many instances where individuals are caught at sobriety points doing always some real bad things that catch the attention of law enforcement agencies. These wring things can be drunk driving, or driving under the intoxication, possessing illegal narcotics possession of a CDS Schedule I narcotic (marijuana) and possession of a CDS Schedule III narcotic drug paraphernalia. If anybody is caught in the sobriety checkpoint, heavy fine to criminal prosecution case can be initiated against the culprit. The culprit is then presented in the courtroom where the magistrate decided the future of the culprit.

But don’t worry; the things will take normal course if you hire a criminal lawyer or attorney. The lawyer or attorney will discuss your case and find out the key points that will help you to come out of the dragnet. The sobriety check point case will be handled by an experienced criminal lawyer or attorney who has the experiences in handling such type of cases. But make sure that you hire appropriate criminal lawyer and not just anybody. Because, if you hire inexperienced attorney or lawyer to fight the sobriety case, then you’d be in a big trouble! Inexperienced criminal lawyers and attorneys can make the situation turn more complex, and if the situation turns complex, even the most experienced criminal lawyer will not be able to get you back your lost dignity.

Caught in sobriety checkpoint, then consult only an experienced lawyer who will otherwise understand the complexities involved in your case and give you more ready made solution. If you really go for the best solution or if you are really concerned that you come out of the trouble as soon as you can, the ideal remedy will be to catch hold of professional and experienced attorney and lawyer who’d be able to study the pros and cons of your case and bring forth reliable solution.

Now the relevant question arises–which is the right means to get an experienced sobriety attorney or lawyer to fight your case and understand its technicalities? The Internet is the best and comprehensive place where you can search for the best and experienced sobriety attorney and which will help you to come out of the problem as quick as possible. Shop around online to find the experienced sobriety attorney, and also take some time out to read through the terms and conditions.

Hundreds of arrests are made at sobriety check points, and therefore you need to show complete restraint even if you get caught in any of unexplainable situation. All you need to do is hire a sobriety attorney or lawyer and discuss your condition with him in as much detail as possible.